Sunday, January 10, 2010

Law Library of Congress Now on YouTube

The Law Library of Congress has started making content available on YouTube (Law and the Library) and iTunes. In iTunes, search for Library of Congress and then select the "Law and the Library" iTunesU series.

Law and the Library is a series of debates and discussions on a wide variety of contemporary legal issues.

Earlier Library Boy posts on YouTube and legal information include:
  • YouTube as a Legal Information Tool (January 14, 2007): "The Parisian daily Le Monde reported last week that lawyers representing an individual being detained by U.S. authorities at the Guantanamo Bay prison camp have produced a video posted on YouTube."
  • More on YouTube as Legal Information Tool (March 30, 2007): "This Wednesday, Slate.com published an article entitled The YouTube Defense - Human rights go viral that analyzes the impact and potential of non-traditional means such as web 2.0 technologies as legal tools: (...) 'Critics pooh-pooh the importance of all of this by pointing to the fact that civil rights advocates have traditionally had a friend in the press. But they're missing the point: YouTube goes where the mainstream media can't or won't go. It's visceral. It's story first, message second. And it gives advocates instant access to an audience in a way that press releases and op-eds never ca' .The Slate article also describes an online video created by a former Marine who paid two friends $800 to waterboard him in his basement."
  • European Commission Launches Eutube (July 2, 2007): "The European Commission has just launched eutube, the YouTube space for news and announcements about European Union policies."
  • Fighting Crime With YouTube (February 26, 2008): "Last week, the British Broadcasting Corporation published a story about how police officials in the UK have been monitoring the video sharing site YouTube for evidence of crimes. The story, entitled Judge YouTube, describes a number of incidents where videos posted to the site have led to arrests. In many cases, perpetrators of illegal acts filmed themselves and then posted material to the Internet, perhaps as a way of showing off."
  • University Law Lectures on YouTube (March 31, 2008): "The YouTube video sharing portal has created a special section with videos from higher education establishments worldwide."
  • Official European Union Website Gets Makeover (September 22, 2009): "Europa – the European Union’s official website - has just had a makeover (...) the layout has been simplified and the site has been divided into 6 main themes: ... Take Part! (online debates, blogs, YouTube videos)"
  • UK Law Reports Get Their Own YouTube Channel (October 28, 2009): "Videos include interviews with the Law Report editors, a history of the ICLR, a video on the process of how a case goes from trial to official report, and a brief introduction to case law research using both online databases and hard copy reference works."

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 4:49 pm

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