Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Cornell’s Legal Information Institute Publishes Enhanced US Constitution Annotated

The Legal Information Institute (LII) at Cornell University has published the Enhanced Constitution Annotated, a web version of the non-partisan Congressional Research Service’s Constitution Annotated (a document that is in the hundreds of pages).

As per an explanatory note:
"The content of the U.S. Constitution Annotated was prepared by the Congressional Research Service (CRS) at the Library of Congress, and published electronically in plaintext and PDF by the Government Printing Office. Dating back to 1911, the initial online annotations were published in 1992."
"This edition is a hypertext interpretation of the CRS text, updated to the currently published version. It links to Supreme Court opinions, the U.S. Code, and the Code of Federal Regulations, as well as enhancing navigation through linked footnotes and tables of contents."
LII, based at the Cornell Law School in Ithaca, New York, was founded in 1992 with the goal of making American legal materials freely available on the Internet.

Labels: , ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 12:38 pm 0 comments links to this post

Monday, September 17, 2018

Supreme Court of Canada: New Library Titles

The list of new library titles added to the Supreme Court of Canada collection from September 1st to 15th, 2018 is now available on the Court website.

It is possible to subscribe via e-mail to receive the list.

Labels:

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 5:59 pm 0 comments links to this post

Sunday, September 16, 2018

September 2018 Issue of Governance and Recordkeeping Around the World

The Governance and Recordkeeping Around the World newsletter, published by Library and Archives Canada (LAC), highlights issues pertaining to government and recordkeeping practices in the public and private sectors around the world.

The September 2018 issue has just been published.

It includes:

  • news items from Canada and around the world
  • announcements of upcoming Canadian and international events (meetings, conferences, seminars)
  • project and product news in areas such as digitization, archives, open source, e-government, access to information and Web 2.0
  • listings of papers and readings (white papers, presentations, reports)

Labels: , , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 5:54 pm 0 comments links to this post

Thursday, September 13, 2018

University Affairs Article on Rise of Aboriginal Law in Canada

University Affairs, the journal of the organization Universities Canada (formerly the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada), published an article last week on The rise of Aboriginal law.

It describes how Canada's law schools are quickly revamping their programs to introduce more courses on Indigenous issue and legal traditions:
"... a string of Supreme Court challenges, land claims disputes and clashes over billion-dollar resource developments have vaulted Indigenous issues into the spotlight and transformed Aboriginal law into the fastest-growing sector of the legal landscape. Most major legal firms in Canada now employ an Aboriginal law group and there are dozens of smaller boutique firms that focus solely on the topic (...)"

"In reaction to this rapidly evolving legal landscape, and in response to the 2015 Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action, law schools have not only bolstered their Aboriginal law offerings but are also introducing new courses aimed at enhancing students’ understanding of Indigenous issues and legal traditions (...) "

"One of the TRC’s list of 94 recommendations is aimed directly at law schools. Number 28 requires that all law students take a mandatory course in Aboriginal people and the law, which 'includes the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal–Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights and anti-racism'. "

Labels: ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:28 pm 0 comments links to this post

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

University of Virginia School of Law Launches Brett Kavanaugh Project Website

The University of Virginia School of Law has launched the Brett Kavanaugh Project Website about the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court.

It assembles all of Kavanaugh’s written opinions, as well as concurrences and dissents he either wrote or joined as a judge for the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Earlier Library Boy posts about Kavanaugh:

Labels: ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:46 pm 0 comments links to this post

Citation Requirements of Canada Courts

Susannah Tredwell published a tip on Slaw.ca this week  on Citing Case Law and Legislation.

Her tip mentions the 9th edition of the Canadian Guide to Uniform Legal Citation (AKA "The McGill Guide").

The Guide is often seen as the default for Canadian citation practice, but Tredwell lists a series of Canadian courts with "slightly different citation requirements".

Labels: ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:35 pm 0 comments links to this post

Monday, September 10, 2018

Most Recent Issue of LawNow: #MeToo Movement

The most recent issue of LawNow is available online.

The magazine is published by the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta.

The issue features a series of articles on the #MeToo Movement.

Labels: ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:48 pm 0 comments links to this post

Performance & Learning Month at Librarianship.ca

The website Librarianship.ca will be highlighting continuing professional education resources during the month of September which is Performance & Learning Month.

The first resource is a new journal called Emerging Library & Information Perspectives:
"Emerging Library & Information Perspectives (ELIP), published by the FIMS Graduate Library at Western University and hosted by Western Libraries, published its inaugural issue this year! The scope of the journal includes contributions related to the field of library and information science, broadly construed. The journal accepts submissions from current Western University MLIS students in the form of research articles, critical essays, reviews, interviews, pieces written practically for the field, and pieces written from experiences working in the field."

"ELIP breaks through barriers in scholarly communication by being freely accessible and available online to people inside or outside the field of library and information science. The journal encourages perspectives on all different types of librarianship or information work, and also accepts multimodal content such as audio, video and images."

Labels:

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:46 pm 0 comments links to this post

Thursday, September 06, 2018

Opportunity for Input on Future of Library and Archives Canada

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is seeking input from Canadians on what they think the institution's priorities should be over the next three years in its 2019–2022 plan:
"We are asking Canadians to share their ideas and suggestions by email and on PlaceSpeak, an online engagement platform as we prepare our 2019–2022 three-year plan. We have held a series of meetings with our stakeholders and employees, for reflection and exchange and now we wish to broaden our consultation."

"Your feedback will help us develop a plan to guide us for the next three years. The plan will be made public in winter 2019."

"To maintain consistency and continuity in our operations, commitments and stakeholder relationships, we will draw on the main priorities in the 2016–2019 plan. You can read the environmental scan summary prepared by our Strategic Research and Policy team for these consultations."
LACis interested in people's thoughts on the following questions:
  • What do you expect from your national library and national archives?
  • What trends (social, technological, demographic or other) should influence our planning for the next three to five years? Why?
  • What activities should we focus on, and why?
The deadline is September 14, 2014.

Labels:

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 9:37 pm 0 comments links to this post

Lightning Talks on Canadian Digital Preservation Initiatives

The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) is organizing @Risk North 2: Digital Collections, a one-day forum to be held in Montreal on November 9, 2018.

As part of that forum,  Canadian institutions are being invited to submit proposals for 5-minute lightning talks describing major current digital preservation initiatives:
"Academic libraries, public libraries, national libraries, museums, archives, and any other organizations involved in the digital preservation of cultural and documentary heritage are welcome to submit. Presentations will be selected to reflect a diverse selection of initiatives that are building significant technical, organizational or policy capacity for the preservation of one or more types of digital content."
The deadline is September 20, 2018.

Labels:

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 9:32 pm 0 comments links to this post

Wednesday, September 05, 2018

U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee Hearings Begin for Supreme Court Nominee Kavanaugh

Hearings on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the United States Supreme Court began this week in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington, D.C.

There are many sources to follow.

Here are two of them:
Earlier Library Boy posts about Kavanaugh:

Labels: ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:40 pm 0 comments links to this post

New Concordia University Library Featured in 2018 Library Design Showcase

The journal American Libraries has published its 2018 Library Design Showcase, an "annual celebration of new and renovated libraries".

One of the libraries featured in the slideshow accompanying the article is Concordia University's Webster Library in Montreal. There was an article in Canadian Architect back in the spring when the library opened.

Labels:

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:30 pm 0 comments links to this post

Tuesday, September 04, 2018

September 2018 Issue of In Session - E-Newsletter of Canadian Association of Law Libraries

The September 2018 issue of In Session is available online.

It is the monthly e-newsletter of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) and contains news from CALL committees and special interest groups, member updates and events.

Labels: , ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:34 pm 0 comments links to this post

Monday, September 03, 2018

New South Wales Law Reform Commission Consultation on Digital Assets after Death

The Law Reform Commission in New South Wales, Australia has released a consultation paper on laws that affect access to a person's digital assets after they die or become incapacitated.

As a background document explains:
"In general, a person's digital property and electronic communications are referred to as 'digital assets'. These can include photographs, videos, emails, online banking accounts, cryptocurrency, domain names, blogs and online gaming accounts."

"Digital assets can have significant personal, sentimental and even financial value. Permitting access to these assets after the person's death or incapacity is therefore essential. However, family members and fiduciaries can encounter significant barriers in acquiring access, largely due to the terms of service agreements between users and service providers."

"In response to these barriers, there is an emerging trend of overseas litigation involving grieving families seeking access to their deceased relative's digital assets. Australian courts appear to have not yet considered these issues."

"The NSW Law Reform Commission has been asked to review and report on access to digital assets upon death or incapacity. Our review will consider the current state of the law, developments that have occurred in other jurisdictions, and whether NSW should enact legislation to address the difficulties in accessing the digital assets of a deceased or incapacitated person."
The consultation document looks at the situation in the United States, Canada, and the European Union.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 4:44 pm 0 comments links to this post

New Guide on Marrakesh Treaty for People With print Disabilities

The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) has published a guide for librarians on Getting Started with the Marrakesh Treaty:
"The Marrakesh Treaty entered into force in September 2016, faster than any other international copyright text in the last 40 years. It promises to remove some of the key barriers to access to information by people with print disabilities."

"Yet the Treaty will only be effective, where it has been incorporated into national law, when libraries and others are using it. Yet not all librarians feel confident in dealing with copyright law, potentially leaving users without the access they need."

"This guide, edited by Victoria Owen, and with the wecome support of the World Blind Union, the Canadian Association of Research LIbraries, and the Unviersity of Toronto, offers answers to frequently asked questions. It can also be adapted by national actors to their own laws - IFLA encourages this, in order to get the largest possible number of libraries involved."

Labels: , , ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 4:32 pm 0 comments links to this post

Supreme Court of Canada: New Library Titles

The list of new library titles added to the Supreme Court of Canada collection from August 16 to 31, 2018 is now available on the Court website.

It is possible to subscribe via e-mail to receive the list.

Labels:

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 4:26 pm 0 comments links to this post

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Law Library of Congress Interview With Foreign Law Intern Ben Hills

In Custodia Legis, the blog of the Law Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., has posted an interview this week with Ben Hills, Foreign Law Intern from the UK:


"How would you describe your job to other people?
I am currently an intern for the Global Legal Research Directorate and am working under the supervision of Clare Feikert-Ahalt, senior foreign law specialist for British and Commonwealth jurisdictions. We receive requests from the U.S. Congress, executive agencies, the federal judiciary, and from the public and conduct research into the law of the United Kingdom, British Overseas Territories and nations of the Commonwealth, including Caribbean nations and other former British colonies."

"Why did you want to work at the Law Library of Congress?
The Law Library of Congress is one of the premier law libraries in the world, with the world’s largest collection of legal texts, and an internship represented a significant opportunity to both expand my legal knowledge and sharpen my research skills and writing abilities. Also, the Law Library’s commitment to providing information about and truly understanding other nations and cultures is a beacon of hope in a world where sometimes it appears close-mindedness and fear may be winning (...)"
The Library has conducted a huge number of interviews with employees and interns.

The Law Library of Congress is the world’s largest law library, with a collection of close to 2.9 million volumes from all ages of history and virtually every jurisdiction in the world.

Labels: , ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:48 pm 0 comments links to this post

Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Canadian Association of Law Libraries Wants to Intervene in Supreme Court of Canada Copyright Case

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) is considering whether to seek intervenor status in an upcoming appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada dealing with Crown Copyright.

In a communication sent to all CALL members today, the Executive Board of the association wrote:

Keatley Surveying Ltd v Teranet Inc, SCC docket 37863 (Ontario) (Civil) (by leave): Proposed motion by CALL/ACBD to intervene

On June 21, 2018, the Supreme Court of Canada granted leave to appeal in the matter of Keatley Surveying Ltd v Teranet Inc. The decision now under appeal, 2017 ONCA 748, held that copyright in plans of survey deposited with Teranet belong to Ontario, by operation of s 12 of the Copyright Act.
This case is important to law librarians and the legal profession (among other groups, such as government information professionals and copyright professionals) because it will be the first time the SCC squarely considers s 12 of the Copyright Act. Section 12 is the current iteration of the legislative provision that brought the notion of Crown copyright into Canadian law in 1911.

Crown copyright and primary law:

The memorandum of argument of the applicant/appellant (Keatley) which supported the successful leave application makes clear that the question of the interpretation of the words in s 12 is a key question before the court:

32.The applicant submits that this case raises the following issues of national and public importance:

(1) What is the test for determining whether a work is “prepared or published by or under the direction or control of Her Majesty or any government department” within the meaning of s. 12 of the Copyright Act? (...)

CALL/ACBD has directly addressed Parliament twice on the question of the interpretation of these very words, and since 2009 has made a total of at least three consistent statements in favour of the position that Crown copyright should not or does not apply to primary law.

In advance of the 2012 Copyright Act amendments, CALL/ACBD, submitted a letter to the Bill C-32 review committee. Among the submissions CALL/ACBD made was a recommendation that Parliament review Crown copyright provision and legislatively make clear that the words of s 12 do not encompass primary law.

Earlier this year, during the current statutory review of the Copyright Act, CALL/ACBD again addressed a Parliamentary committee and again included submissions that squarely addressed Crown copyright. The submission included the recommendation that Parliament make clear that primary law is outside the scope of s 12’s application. The Copyright Committee’s work on CALL/ACBD’s written brief to Parliament is in progress and is foreseen to reiterate this position on Crown copyright.

Fortuitously, the Copyright Committee sponsored a well-attended session at the 2018 conference on this question of Crown copyright and primary law, and that session presented Canadian, historical, comparative, and policy research to support the legal position. That research can support the work of any counsel retained if an intervention application proceeds. Also, members of the legal profession, copyright academia, and copyright bar informally have expressed the view there is merit in this legal position.

Crown copyright and regulatory schemes:

The second question Keatley raised is also within CALL/ACBD’s interests, from a different perspective:

(2) Does s. 12 of the Copyright Act operate to transfer copyright from the creator of a work to the government when the government makes available to the public a work that was submitted to government as part of a filing requirement under a regulatory scheme?

Unlike the first question, this one does not focus on the meaning and scope of application of the words central to the first question and CALL/ACBD’s previous work on Crown copyright and primary law. Nevertheless, this question may also be of interest to CALL/ACBD’s membership because it raises the possibility by extension that any work, including legal briefs, submitted to government as a part of a regulatory scheme becomes the property of the Crown.

Timelines:

The parties will file their formal notices of appeal and cross-appeal by August 21. The factums are due on or before September 25. By Rule 55 of the Rules of the Supreme Court of Canada, any intervention application must be filed within four weeks of that date. The SCC has now specified in the Docket that the deadline for motions to intervene is October 23, 2018.
The text to CALL members goes on the address the pros and cons of the association seeking to intervene in front of the Supreme Ciourt.

Labels: , ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:50 pm 0 comments links to this post

Monday, August 27, 2018

September/October 2018 Issue of AALL Spectrum

The  September/October 2018 issue of AALL Spectrum is now available online.


It is a publication of the American Association of Law Libraries.

Among the feature articles are:
  • Putting Artificial Intelligence to Work in Law Firms
  • Data-Driven Decision-Making: Getting Started with Reference Tracking Systems & Data Analytics
  • Let's Teach Our Student Legal Technology ... But What Should We Include?

Labels: , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 5:57 pm 0 comments links to this post

Sunday, August 26, 2018

Law Commission of England Consultation on Electronic Execution of Documents

The English Law Commission has published a consultation document on the Electronic Execution of Documents.

According to a description by the Commission:
"The law relating to signatures and other formal documentary requirements has a history spanning centuries."

"In today’s world, individuals, consumers and businesses demand modern, convenient methods for entering into binding transactions. Technological developments have changed the ways in which these transactions are made."

"Can the law of England and Wales keep up?"

"Our common law system is flexible and contracts can be created in many ways. Most transactions are not required to be executed in a particular manner. Electronic signatures are validly used instead of handwritten signatures in transactions every day."

"However, the law subjects particular types of documents to certain procedures, such as signing or witnessing."

"We have been told that issues around the electronic execution of documents, including uncertainty around the legal status of electronic signatures, are inhibiting the use of new technology where legislation requires a document to be “signed” or executed as a deed (...)"

"Following our analysis of the law, our provisional conclusion is that an electronic signature is capable in general of meeting a statutory requirement for a signature. We do not consider that legislative reform is necessary. We ask whether consultees agree."

Labels: , , ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:34 pm 0 comments links to this post

New International Law Research Guides From GlobaLex

GlobaLex, a very good electronic collection created by the Hauser Global Law School Program at the New York University School of Law, recently published updates to a few of its research guides.

DipLawMatic Dialogues, the blog of the FCIL Special Interest Section of the American Association of Law Libraries, has the list.

There are updates for the guides on:
  •  the European Human Rights systrem
  • MERCOSUR 
  • the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations
  • U. S. Federal Legal System Web-based Public Accessible Sources
  • the Australian Federal Legal System
  • and more

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:03 pm 0 comments links to this post

Most Recent Issue of Canadian Law Library Review Available

The most recent issue of the Canadian Law Library Review is now available online on the ISSUU platform. It is also available in PDF format.

It is the quarterly journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries.

Labels: ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 5:39 pm 0 comments links to this post

Thursday, August 02, 2018

The Essential Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh Reader

The U.S. Congressional Research Service (CRS) has published The Essential Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh Reader: What Cases Should You Read? (link is to a version of the document on the site of the Federation of American Scientists that reprints many CRS reports):
"Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh, whom President Trump has nominated to fill the impending Supreme Court vacancy caused by Justice Anthony M. Kennedy’s retirement from the Court, has amassed a voluminous record of judicial writings during his legal career. These writings are certain to be a key topic of interest as the Senate prepares to hold hearings and a possible vote on Judge Kavanaugh’s nomination to the High Court. CRS has published a report, Judicial Opinions of Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh, which provides a tabular listing of every judicial opinion authored by Judge Kavanaugh during his time on the federal bench, briefly describing each opinion (and the contrasting approach taken in any separate judicial opinion authored by another member of the panel on which Judge Kavanaugh served) and the primary legal subject the ruling addresses. While the report provides succinct descriptions of more than 300 judicial opinions authored by Judge Kavanaugh (the overwhelming majority as part of a D.C. Circuit panel, though a handful were authored as part of three-judge district court panels), some of the judicial opinions might be particularly useful to Members, congressional committees, and staff seeking to better understand Judge Kavanaugh’s approach to different subjects. The following table, adapted from the larger report, highlights many of Judge Kavanaugh’s judicial opinions that have received the greatest degree of attention from legal observers."
Earlier Library Boy posts about Kavanaugh:

Labels: ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 4:59 pm 0 comments links to this post