Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Canadian Association of Law Libraries 2018 Conference - More Annual Reports

This is a follow-up to yesterday's post entitled Canadian Association of Law Libraries 2018 Conference Annual Reports.

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) will be holding its 2018 annual conference this upcoming weekend in Halifax and committees and special interest groups have been submitting their annual activity reports for members to read.

Here are a few more of them:
  • Scholarships and Awards Committee:
    • The James D. Lang Memorial Scholarship is designed to support attendance at a continuing education program - The successful applicant  is Ilana Newman who will be using the award to assist with attending the New Law Librarians’ Institute 2018.
    • The Diana M. Priestly Memorial Scholarship is intended to support professional development in the field and was given to Michelle Terriss of the University of Alberta.  Ms. Terriss is currently enrolled in the MLIS program and is a Juris Doctor holder and member in good standing of the Law Society of Alberta. 
    • The Education Reserve Fund is used to award money to members to further their education in pursuits that do not fit the guidelines of already established scholarships. These could include such activities as library and/or law courses given outside Canada, study leaves and/or sabbaticals, or other educational activities. The Fund will facilitate attendance for two at the upcoming New Law Librarians’ Institute 2018.  Recipients will be announced at a later date.
    • Recipients of the Michael Silverstein Prize (for an outstanding contribution to enhancing understanding, analysis and appreciation of primary law and legal taxonomy)and the Denis Marshall Memorial Award(to recognize outstanding service to the Association AND/OR the profession of law librarianship)will be announced during the conference. 
  • KF Modified Committee:this committee oversees the development of the KF Modified classification scheme for Canadian law libraries. The committee has been working on the development of a web-based version of the KF Modified Classification as a way to securing the long term sustainability of the classification schedule and promote its use to common law libraries outside of Canada. It is also looking at the logistical implications of the CALL Board decision to make KF Modified available for free to libraries in low- and middle-income countries and in certain Canadian non-profit organizations.
  • Copyright Committee: The federal government commenced its mandatory review of the Copyright Act on December 13, 2017. The Canadian Federation of Library Associations (CFLA), of which CALL is a member, has formed a committee to be involved in the consultation process. 
  • Vendor Liaison Committee (Members only section): Semi-annual vendor calls with LexisNexis and Thomson Reuters have proven to be a productive and efficient way of bringing CALL membership’s issues to the table. The questions and concerns about vendor products and services that are voiced during the calls all come from members. The Committee has noticed that since information about the calls as well as vendor demos is hidden behind the firewall on the CALL website, some members may have problems finding them. The Committee will include better instructions on finding the material as part of its overall communications plan.
  • Hugh Lawford Award for Excellence in Legal Publishing Committee:
    This year's nominees are:
    • Alberta Law Review from the University of Alberta – the ALR is a peer-reviewed student run legal journal, providing a discussion of contemporary legal issues of interest to lawyers, scholars, judges and law students in Alberta and beyond.
    • Criminal Law Series from Emond Publishing – a collection of practical, accessible and affordable handbooks to assist criminal practitioners, judges and students. To date six titles have been published, with ten more planned.
    • The Lawyer’s Daily from Lexis Nexis Canada Inc. – provides real-time Canadian legal news, analysis and current awareness for lawyers and legal professionals.
    • vLex Canada from Compass – in partnership with Justia, Compass brings together vLex Global, along with Canadian resources including Maritime Law Book’s law reporter collection, MLB Topics categories, and selections from Irwin Law’s Essentials of Canadian Law series.
    • The winner will be announced during a reception at the conference on Monday, May 28, 2018.



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Monday, May 21, 2018

Canadian Association of Law Libraries 2018 Conference Annual Reports


The Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) is beginning its 2018 annual conference this upcoming weekend in Halifax.

Annual reports of committees and special interest groups have been submitted in anticipation of the general meeting.

Here are summaries of some of them:
  • Professional Development Committee (PDC): The Professional Development Committee (PDC) ascertains the needs and wishes of the membership in regard to continuing professional education. In the past year, it has worked on issues such as the pricing and housing on CALL website of Advanced Legal Research videos and having CALL conference sessions approved for continuing professional development (“CPD”) credits for members of the legal profession
  • Webinar Sub-Committee: this is a very active sub-committee of the PDC. It held many successful webinars in 2017-18. Topics covered included Libraries and Access to Justice;  US Legislation for Canadian Legal Researchers (Parts One) & Two; Uncovering UN Treaties; Copyright in Context for CALL Members; Platforms, Apps and Omnibots - Alternate Views on the Future of Legal Research; Intersections with Aboriginal and Indigenous Law; US Executive Branch Research for the Canadian Legal Researcher; and Digital Repository Success Stories. Net revenue for the committee reached $2,500 for the year
  • Committee to Promote Research: one of its primary responsibilities is awarding a research grant to a CALL member. This year's grant is being awarded to Megan Siu for her research project entitled Accessing Legal Information as a Self-Represented Litigant in Rural Alberta. Her study “will offer insight into how the nuances of living in rural areas can impact the way that people access legal information...[and will] find trends that are helpful for regional library systems and their member libraries to consider for their own programming purposes”. For the 2018 conference in Nova Scotia, the committee proposed a pre-conference workshop entitled “Writing Persuasively to Build a Better Business Case for your Library”.
  • New Law Librarians’ Institute (NLLI): NLLI is an intensive, week-long program aimed at developing librarians' skills in the key competencies of law librarianship. The 2018 New Law Librarians’ Institute (NLLI) will be held at UCalgary on June 19-22, 2018.  
  • Canadian Law Library Review: Susan Barker (University of Toronto) is stepping down as editor. Nikki Tanner (University of New Brunswick) will take over at the helm.
  • Membership Development Committee (MDC):
    • The MDC runs a very active educational visit program to sell CALL and law librarianship to students enrolled in university library and information studies programs
    • It is also in charge of CALL's mentorship program. For the 2017-18 year, there were 20 mentoring partnerships established through the Mentorship Program (compared to 16 pairs in 2016-2017)
    •  The MDC also produced 6 member profiles on the CALL website.  These profiles spotlight members’ careers and initiatives they have undertaken.  Members were chosen with an aim for mix of new and seasoned professionals and covering various geographic areas in Canada.  This year, the MDC also added profiles of important work projects undertaken by CALL members 
    • Finally, the MDC is working on an initiative for recruiting Government Documents librarians into CALL, as well as scoping out a more general membership recruitment campaign for the association

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 4:47 pm 0 comments links to this post

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Most Recent Issue of Canadian Law Library Review

The most recent issue of the Canadian Law Library Review is available online.

It is a publication of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries.

Feature articles in this issue include:
  • Exploring the Development of a Standard System of Citation Metrics for Legal Academics by Susan Barker, Bora Laskin Law Library, University of Toronto
  • Are Publication and Citation Counts Reliable Indicators of Research Productivity or Impact? by Sean Rehaag,Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto

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Supreme Court of Canada: New Library Titles

The list of new library titles added to the Supreme Court of Canada collection from May 1 to 15, 2018 is now available on the Court website.

It is possible to subscribe via e-mail to receive the list.

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Monday, May 14, 2018

70 Years of the International Law Commission

A few weeks ago, the International Law Commission, a body of the United Nations, started its 70th session in New York City.

As a blog post from the Peace Palace Library in The Hague explains:
"Its achievements range from laying the groundwork for the 1969 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties and the 1998 Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court to adopting the 2001 articles on the responsibility of States for internationally wrongful acts."
The purpose of the Commission, as defined under article 13 (1) (a) of the Charter of the United Nations, is to "initiate studies and make recommendations for the purpose of ... encouraging the progressive development of international law and its codification".

It is currently working on issues such as:
  • Crimes against humanity
  • Immunity of State officials from foreign criminal jurisdiction
  • Provisional application of treaties
  • Identification of customary international law
  • Protection of the environment in relation to armed conflicts
  • Protection of the atmosphere
  • Peremptory norms of general international law (jus cogens)
  • Succession of States in respect of State responsibility
In the past, I have found its research guides to be very useful sources to help understand international law.

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Thursday, May 10, 2018

May 2018 Issue of Governance and Recordkeeping Around the World

The Governance and Recordkeeping Around the World newsletter, published by Library and Archives Canada (LAC), highlights issues pertaining to government and recordkeeping practices in the public and private sectors around the world.

The May 2018 issue has just been published.
It includes:
  • news items from Canada and around the world
  • announcements of upcoming Canadian and international events (meetings, conferences, seminars)
  • project and product news in areas such as digitization, archives, open source, e-government, access to information and Web 2.0
  • listings of papers and readings (white papers, presentations, reports)

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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Supreme Court of Canada Calendar of May 2018 Hearings

The Supreme Court of Canada has published its calendar of appeals that will be heard from May 14 to May 25, 2018.

To find out more about any particular case, click on the docket number in parentheses next to each case name to find docket information, case summaries as well as facta from the parties.

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Thursday, May 03, 2018

Complete Series of Official Supreme Court Reports Now Available on Lexum

All issues of the official Supreme Court Reports dating back to their first publication in 1878 are now available on the Lexum website.

Lexum is the Court's partner which has published Court decisions since 1992 and the Reports since 2013.

Parties to proceedings may cite either the print or PDF version of the Reports in documents filed with the Court.

This initiative is part of the Court’s continued efforts to make case-related information more accessible to the public.

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Wednesday, May 02, 2018

American Libraries Journal Publishes Library Systems Report 2018

American Libraries has just published Library Systems Report 2018, the latest in a series of annual reports on trends in the library technology industry:
"A plethora of integrated library systems (ILS) with long lineages pervades the industry. In many respects these products have not only matured in functionality but have also adapted to changing expectations. The ILS continues to be the dominant solution for public, school, and special libraries, though it faces formidable challenges from LSPs in the academic library sphere."

"In 2017, many ILS vendors devoted considerable development efforts to web-based interfaces. Many have evolved from earlier client-server technologies with graphic interfaces installed on the computers of staff members or service desks. The age of client-server computing has passed, and the transition to web interfaces is long overdue. Libraries seek fully web-based products without compromising the rich functionality and efficiencies embodied in legacy platforms. It’s unfortunate at this late phase of the cycle of cloud computing that development efforts are consumed in a lateral move toward new interfaces at the expense of innovations."
The 2018 edition looks at corporate consolidation, technical and sales trends in the industry, and product profiles for the academic, school and special library markets.

It is written by Marshall Breeding, a well-known library tech expert. He also edits the Library Technology Guides website and produces the annual International Library Automation Perceptions Surveys.

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Tuesday, May 01, 2018

May 2018 Issue of In Session - E-Newsletter of Canadian Association of Law Libraries

The May 2018 issue of In Session is available online.

It is the monthly e-newsletter of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) and contains news from CALL committees and special interest groups, member updates and events.

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Monday, April 30, 2018

Supreme Court of Canada: New Library Titles

The list of new library titles added to the Supreme Court of Canada collection from April 16 to 30, 2018 is now available on the Court website.

It is possible to subscribe via e-mail to receive the list.

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Sunday, April 29, 2018

Statistics Canada Report on Hate Crimes

The Statistics Canada publication Juristat last week released an article on Police-reported hate crime in Canada, 2016.

It examines the nature and extent of police-reported hate crime in Canada, including motivations for hate crime (for example, race/ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation), types of offences, geographical comparisons and accused/victim characteristics. The article uses data from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, which gathers data from police records.

Highlights:
  • In 2016, police reported 1,409 criminal incidents in Canada that were motivated by hate, an increase of 3% or 47 more incidents than reported the previous year.
  • The increase in the total number of incidents was largely attributable to an increase in police-reported hate crimes motivated by hatred of a sexual orientation (+35 incidents) or of a race or ethnicity (+25 incidents). Hate crimes accounted for less than 0.1% of the nearly 1.9 million police-reported crimes in 2016 (excluding traffic offences).
  • Police-reported hate crimes targeting sexual orientation rose 25% in 2016 to 176 incidents, compared with 141 incidents in 2015. These incidents accounted for 13% of hate crimes reported in 2016 and 11% of hate crimes reported in 2015.
  • Between 2015 and 2016, the number of police-reported crimes motivated by hatred of a race or ethnicity increased 4% (from 641 to 666). In all, 48% of all police-reported hate crimes in 2016 were motivated by hatred of a race or ethnicity. Much of this increase was a result of more hate crimes targeting South Asians (+24 incidents) and Arabs and West Asians (+20 incidents). Despite posting a decrease in 2016, crimes targeting Black populations remained one of the most common types of hate crimes (15% of all hate crimes).
  • Overall, 33% of hate crimes reported in 2016 were motivated by hatred of religion. Compared with 2015, the number of hate crimes motivated by religion decreased 2% in 2016 (from 469 in 2015 to 460 in 2016). Police-reported crimes motivated by hate against the Jewish population rose from 178 incidents in 2015 to 221 incidents in 2016 (+24%). In contrast, the number of crimes targeting the Catholic population fell from 55 to 27 incidents. Similarly, crimes targeting the Muslim population decreased 13% (from 159 incidents in 2015 to 139 incidents in 2016).
  • Based on data from police services that reported characteristics of hate crimes, 43% of police-reported hate crimes in 2016 were violent offences. Violent offences included, for example, assault, uttering threats and criminal harassment. Overall, the number of violent hate crimes rose 16% from the previous year (from 487 to 563 violent incidents), driven by increases in common assault, criminal harassment and uttering threats.
  • Crimes motivated by hatred of a sexual orientation continued to be among the most violent hate crimes. In 2016, 71% of these types of police-reported hate crimes were violent, compared with 45% of crimes motivated by hatred of a race or ethnicity and 27% of hate crimes targeting a religion.
  • Non-violent offences made up 57% of police-reported hate crimes in 2016. Mischief, which includes vandalism and graffiti, was the most commonly reported offence among police-reported hate crimes and accounted for 41% of all hate crime incidents in 2016. 

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Thursday, April 26, 2018

Bloomberg's Points of Law Wins American Association of Law Libraries New Product of the Year Award

The American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) announced this week that Bloomberg's Points of Law is the winner of its 2018 New Product of the Year Award:
"Introduced in 2016 using artificial intelligence and machine learning to assist in legal research, Points of Law is a product of Bloomberg Law."

"Points of Law allows users to quickly identify and analyze language in a judicial opinion. The product adds a layer of automated indexing to its 13 million—and counting—library of published and unpublished state and federal court opinions to provide users with a decision’s legal points and identify legal precedents. In addition, researchers can conduct keyword searches across all case law or specific jurisdictions within the content library (...)"

"AALL’s New Product Award honors new commercial information products that enhance or improve existing law library services or procedures—or products that improve access to legal information, the legal research process, or procedures for the technical processing of library materials. "

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 1:30 pm 0 comments links to this post

New Law Librarians' Institute 2018 Program Now Available

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries is sponsoring the 2018 New Law Librarians' Institute (NLLI) at the University of Calgary from June 19 - 22, 2018.

It is an intensive, week-long program aimed at developing librarians' skills in the key competencies of law librarianship.

The full program is now available.

Register online for NLLI.

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Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Updated International Law Research Guides From GlobaLex

GlobaLex, the electronic collection created by the Hauser Global Law School Program at the New York University School of Law, recently updated some of its research guides:
  • A Legal Analysis of "Space Asset" Under the 2012 Space Protocol to the International Interests in Mobile Equipment: "The ongoing privatization and commercialization of today's space industry creates more financial risks for private sector financiers, and the movable nature of space activities may cause legal uncertainties of the security interests. Given such situation, the 2001 UNIDROIT Convention on International Interests in Mobile Equipment (the "Cape Town Convention") and the 2012 Protocol to the Cape Town Convention on Matters Specific to Space Assets (the "Space Protocol") marked a significant development in harmonizing and unifying the rules of asset-backed finance for mobile space equipment. As a key term in the Space Protocol, the concept of "Space Asset" was for the first time introduced in the Cape Town Convention and defined under the Space Protocol, which may impact contemporary international space law that formed mainly from the UN space law treaties. This article will first explain and analyze the definition of “Space Asset,” then further discuss issues related to this new concept, including the delimitation issue, the relationship between an Aircraft Object and a Space Asset, as well as the differences and similarities between Space Assets under the Space Protocol and a Space Object under the UN space law treaties."
  • "Paper Satellites" and the Free Use of Outer Space: "At roughly 36,000 km above the equator lies a resource highly sought after by all States: the geostationary orbit (“GSO”). Declared a natural limited resource, with the characteristic of holding an object in the same position relative to the surface of Earth over the course of a day, it is not surprising that the available GSO satellite slots are approaching saturation. Yet, not all states have a satellite placed in orbit, due to economic, technologic or political constrictions. This impairment of the states in their capability to participate has triggered a speculative phenomenon with the International Telecommunications Union (“ITU”) known as “over-filing.” Over-filing consists of registering unneeded uses of orbit resources and has the effect of foreclosing others, who have near-term needs, from achieving access and enjoying the free use of this space resource. As a consequence of this practice, some states risk being denied the right to use outer space freely, a right which has been generally recognized in international space legislation. To set the framework, the beginning of this article will bring forth the emergence of the “paper satellite” practice, which will be more clearly reflected in section three in the cases of the Tongasat and the Iranian Zohrer-1 and 2 satellites. The nature of the GSO will be discussed in order to demonstrate the application of the principle of "free use of outer space" to the issue in the fourth chapter. The fifth chapter will deal with an analysis of the compatibility of over-filing practices and the free use of outer space principles. The sixth chapter will look into the most recent measures taken by the ITU to address paper satellites and this article ends with personal concluding remarks."

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:57 pm 0 comments links to this post

Manitoba Law Reform Commission Consultation Report on The Beneficiary Designation Act

The Manitoba Law Reform Commission has published a consultation paper on The Beneficiary Designation Act (Retirement, Savings and Other Plans):
"Pension plans, insurance proceeds, and other retirement savings vehicles play an important role in the savings strategies of Canadians. As individuals pay into these plans over the years, issues arise such as: what happens when the plan owner dies? Where does the money go?"

"In Manitoba, the treatment of the proceeds of these financial products upon the death of the owner is regulated by The Insurance Act, The Pension Benefits Act and The Beneficiary Designation Act (Retirement, Savings and Other Plans) (hereinafter “The Beneficiary Designation Act”). The latter provides for designation of beneficiaries to occur without the formalities required under The Wills Act."

"Recently, a gap in The Beneficiary Designation Act came to the attention of the Commission respecting beneficiary designations when plans are renewed, replaced or converted. In these situations, a new plan is created and the old plan ceases to exist. Plan beneficiary designations do not automatically roll over and a fresh beneficiary designation must be made or, upon the death of the owner of the plan, the proceeds are payable to the plan owner’s estate. A further look at the legislation and comparison with the legislation of other jurisdictions highlighted several other potential deficiencies in Manitoba’s legislative scheme."

"This Consultation Report considers possible amendments to improve the legislation and procedure related to beneficiary designations in Manitoba. Given the popularity of pension plans, registered savings plans, and other retirement savings vehicles in the marketplace today, it is important to ensure that the legislative scheme in place provides appropriate and adequate guidance to plan owners, designated beneficiaries and the legal profession. "

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Monday, April 23, 2018

CanLII Announces More Commentary

CanLII, the Canadian legal Information Institute that makes legal information content available to Canadians free of charge, has been aggressively adding commentary to its online collections in recent months.

As a recent blog post on its site explains, it is expanding its offerings of law journals, newsletters, materials from legal non-profits and law reform commissions, etc.:
"We continue to work at making sure that the Canadian legal community has the tools it needs in ways that give them the best value possible. Commentary is the next logical step. For the growing number of users of CanLII who rely only on open materials for their practice (for need or by choice), knowing that one particular law review or content provider publishes materials openly on its site or other platform is great. Having access to a list of what’s open and the possibility of searching it all at once in the same interface than where they search for primary law is better by several orders of magnitude."

"In short, publishing more commentary on CanLII will facilitate improved access and discoverability of existing secondary content that’s currently published around the web, which will help this valuable content become more integrated into researchers regular processes."

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:26 pm 0 comments links to this post

Report on Higher Education Inter-Library Loan Management Benchmarks

New York-based Primary Research Group has released a report entitled Higher Education Inter-Library Loan Management Benchmarks, 2018:
"The study presents data from 39 colleges and universities predominantly from the USA but also from the UK, France, Spain, Denmark, Israel and New Zealand, among other countries.  The 160+ page comprehensive study presents detailed data on budgets, staffing, borrowing and lending, turnaround time, technology use, consortia and partnerships, revenues and costs, eBook lending, special collections lending, audio-visual materials lending and much else ..."

"Just a few of the report’s many findings are that:
  • The vast majority of respondents reported that ILL staffing has stayed the same over the last three years.
  • Only 10% participated in international agreements or consortia.
  • For borrowing requests fulfilled through transfer of paper resources by post or courier, the average turnaround time for articles is between 6 and 7 days and for books is between 7 and 8 days."
Print and PDF versions are available for $112.00 (US). Site licenses are also available.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:17 pm 0 comments links to this post

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Getting to Know the Index to Foreign Legal Periodicals Part Two

This is a follow-up to the February 26, 2018 post entitled Getting to Know the Index to Foreign Legal Periodicals.

The Index has been around since 1960 and is now available on the HeinOnline platform.

In this 2nd post, DipLawMatic Dialogues, the blog published by the Foreign, Comparative, and International Law Special Interest Group of the American Association of Law Libraries, looks at the breadth and scope of the database:
"As its name implies, the IFLP focuses primarily on law journals published outside the U.S. Casual users of the Index may be surprised at just how broad its coverage is. The IFLP includes over 365,000 records of articles and book reviews published in more than 500 top law journals from jurisdictions throughout the world. More than 60,000 of these articles are available in full text on HeinOnline. Articles from nearly four dozen international, regional, jurisdiction-specific, and subject-specific legal yearbooks also are included. In addition, the IFLP analyzes the contents of approximately 50 individually published collections of essays, Festschriften, Mélanges, and congress reports each year. Roughly half of the articles indexed are published in languages other than English. In total, more than two dozen languages are represented, making the IFLP the only truly multilingual index to legal scholarship worldwide."

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:40 pm 0 comments links to this post