Thursday, November 21, 2019

Five Questions with Andrea Black, Dentons Canada

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) has been running a series of member profiles called Five Questions With...

The most recent interview is with Andrea Black, Research Specialist at Dentons Canada:
"What is one thing that’s surprised you about the legal information profession? (...)
I’ve probably been most surprised by how much legal and government information is not available electronically, and how much of it is not available to the public. Even as wonderful people and organizations work hard to scan that material and make it available, it’s getting harder and harder to track other items down as governments close departmental libraries, as libraries restrict their inter-library loans, and as budget cuts everywhere force us all to weed our collections of older, less-used items."

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 3:17 pm 0 comments

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Supreme Court of Canada Judicial Biography Series: Justice Sheilah Martin

This is a follow-up to the blog post of November 13, 2019 entitled The Court.ca Series of Biographies of Supreme Court of Canada Justices.

Court.ca, the blog staffed by students of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto, has been running a series of biographies of the justices of the Supreme Court of Canada.

The latest biography is that of Justice Sheilah Martin.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:55 pm 0 comments

Tuesday, November 19, 2019

13 Questions With Sophie Cayer, IM Broker, Employment and Social Development Canada

The librarianship.ca website has been running a series of librarian profiles called 13 Questions With ...

Here is the most recent one about Sophie Cayer, IM Broker, Employment and Social Development Canada:
"Career advice – what’s your top tip?
Networking is key. I can’t say how many times friends, colleagues and former colleagues have had great job opportunities by knowing the right people. My top tip to help your career is to have a solid reputation as a positive, hard-working team player."

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:16 pm 0 comments

Monday, November 18, 2019

Discussion Paper on Corporate Criminal Responsibility in Australia

The Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) has released a discussion paper on Australia’s corporate criminal responsibility:
"The ALRC seeks stakeholder submissions on 23 proposals for reform to the Commonwealth’s corporate criminal law regime, and asks 11 questions on particular areas of reform. The Discussion Paper addresses a number of aspects of corporate criminal liability, including:

• the principled division between criminal offences and civil penalty provisions;
• the method for attributing criminal liability to corporations;
• individual liability for corporate offences;
• deferred prosecution agreements;
• penalties and the sentencing process;
• illegal phoenix activity (deliberate liquidation with the intent to avoid creditors and continue operations through a new entity); and
• the implications of the transnational nature of business and extraterritorial offences."
The ALRC's final report to the government will be published in April 2020.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:18 pm 0 comments

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Supreme Court of Canada: New Library Titles

The list of new library titles added to the Supreme Court of Canada collection from November 1-15, 2019 is now available on the Court website.

It is possible to subscribe via e-mail to receive the list.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 1:44 pm 0 comments

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

The Court.ca Series of Biographies of Supreme Court of Canada Justices

Court.ca, the blog staffed by students of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto, has been running a series of biographies of the justices of the Supreme Court of Canada.

In the intro post on August 15, 2019, Kristopher Kinsinger wrote:
"Canadians can take pride in our relatively depoliticized and merit-based judicial appointment process and in the high calibre of judges who continue to make up our final court of appeal. Yet it would also be fallacious to assume that our top jurists do not approach their work with philosophies that have been shaped by their professional and judicial experiences. The justices of the SCC are not oracles whose worldviews or decisions are above the transparencies imposed by critical evaluation; our judges are, in a word, human, and as such are not above the rigours of informed criticism."

"With this in mind, our hope is that this series will help our fellow law students, lawyers, and legal scholars to think more deeply about the judges who sit on the SCC. We believe that a more nuanced appreciation of this aspect of the SCC’s jurisprudence can only serve to bolster the confidence of Canadians in their judiciary."
The biographies in the series are:
There are still 2 more justices to cover: Justice Sheila Martin and Justice Nicholas Kasirer.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:15 pm 0 comments

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Most Recent Issue of LawNow: Family Break-ups

The most recent issue of LawNow is available online. The magazine is published by the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta.
The issue features a series of articles on "Family Break-ups & the Law".

There is also a special report on globbalization.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:10 pm 0 comments

Thursday, November 07, 2019

Annual Statutes of Alberta Added to CanLII

The CanLII website (Canadian Legal Information Institute) has been rapidly expanding its digital collections of Canadian legislation.

Today, it announced that it has added the annual statutes for the Province of Alberta from 1906 to today:
"This latest digitization project builds on similar initiatives on CanLII.org to increase access to important troves of legal history and decision-making. The Saskatchewan annual statutes dating to 1978 were scanned and added to CanLII last year with funding from the Saskatchewan Law Foundation. Last year we also added the New Brunswick annual statutes back to 2000 with funding from the New Brunswick Law Foundation, with more coming. These joined the Federal annual statutes to 2001 and Quebec annual statutes to 1996, which were added in 2016 with funding from CAIJ."

"Annual statutes – laws as passed by Canada’s parliamentary bodies – are an important addition to CanLII’s primary law collections. Without access to these documents, it can be difficult to navigate legislation over time."
CanLII is a portal funded by Canada’s provincial and territorial law societies to make legal information content (court judgments, tribunal decisions, statutes and regulations, commentary) available to Canadians free of charge.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 3:41 pm 0 comments

Library of Parliament Background Paper on Appointment of Officers of Parliament

Canada's Library of Parliament recently published a new Background Paper on the Appointment of Officers of Parliament:
"Officers of Parliament are responsible directly to Parliament rather than to the government or a federal minister. This emphasizes their independence from the government of the day. They carry out duties assigned by statute and report to one or both chambers of Parliament."

"There are nine officers of Parliament: 1) the Auditor General of Canada; 2) the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada; 3) the Commissioner of Official Languages; 4) the Information Commissioner of Canada; 5) the Privacy Commissioner of Canada; 6) the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner; 7) the Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada; 8) the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada; and 9) the Parliamentary Budget Officer (...)"

"Federally, there is no statutory definition of what constitutes a parliamentary officer. However, the role and function of these officers are distinct from those of other positions such as the Clerk of either house, the Sergeant-at-Arms, the Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel or the Parliamentary Librarian. The latter officials assist Parliament in procedural and administrative matters, whereas officers of Parliament support Parliament in its accountability and scrutiny functions, and in carrying out other tasks."

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 3:35 pm 0 comments

Tuesday, November 05, 2019

Diversity in Law Librarianship - Broadening The Pipeline

Law librarian David Whelan explores the issue of The Law Librarian Pipeline in a recent post on LexBlog:
"Diversity is a challenge for lots of reasons. Smarter people than me have already looked at, discussed, and identified tools or methods to improve the diversity of law library staff. It’s an obvious and positive goal for organizations but it’s not an easy one to solve. There are some things, though, that as a hiring manager, seem like opportunities to change."
In the post, Whelan looks at different ways to find candidates that would broaden the diversity of the candidate pool.

He identifies three strategies that could prove useful for managers who are looking for practical solutions:
"It may be some time before I’m in a position to hire again but when it comes around, I’ll be more successful at reaching a diverse candidate pool if I can:
  • eliminate or make optional the degree credentials (MLS, JD, and library technician) to allow experienced candidates to apply
  • identify candidate pools (through professional associations or informal references) that would not normally apply, to encourage them to do so
  • communicate to our organization that every new hire requires training and acclimation to fit into the team and environment, and a more flexible approach may require, short term, a longer learning curve, but the pay off is a permanently more diverse team"

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:28 pm 0 comments

LawBytes Podcast on Crown Copyright

In his most recent LawBytes podcast, University of Ottawa law professor Michael Geist looks at the issue of Crown Copyright in Canada:
"This week’s Lawbytes podcast digs into crown copyright with two guests. First, Amanda Wakaruk, a copyright librarian at the University of Alberta and one of the country’s leading advocates on the issue joins me to explain the concept of crown copyright and why she thinks it needs to be abolished. I’m then joined by my colleague Professor Jeremy DeBeer to discuss the recent Supreme Court of Canada decision on Keatley Surveying v. Teranet, which was on the first opportunities for Canada’s highest court to grapple with the scope and implications of crown copyright."
An earlier Library Boy post from September 26, 2019 on the Supreme Court of Canada Ruling on Crown Copyright provides background to the topic.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:20 pm 0 comments

Monday, November 04, 2019

November 2019 Issue of In Session - E-Newsletter of Canadian Association of Law Libraries

The November 2019 issue of In Session is available online.

It is the monthly e-newsletter of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) and contains news from CALL committees and special interest groups, member updates and events.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:03 pm 0 comments

Sunday, November 03, 2019

Survey of Law School Faculty, Evaluation of the Law Library 2020

Primary Research Group, a New York-based publisher of research reports and surveys about law libraries, has published the Survey of Law School Faculty, Evaluation of the Law Library 2020 Edition ($158.00US):
"This 113-page study presents data from a survey of 107 law faculty and administration from more than 60 law schools in the United States and Canada about how they feel about their law school libraries (...)"

"The study presents detailed data on overall satisfaction with the law library and with many distinct facets and features of the library and library staff. Unique data sets are available on satisfaction with interlibrary loan, group study rooms, database range and availability, information technology, information literacy training, eBook collections, journal collections, and much more (...)"

"Just a few of the report’s many findings are that:
  • Faculty in top ranked law schools were far less likely than those in lower ranked schools to think of themselves as highly proficient in legal information searching.
  • More than 91% of professors in the sample have asked a law librarian for assistance in the past year.
  • Only 6.54% of the sample had contacted a law librarian by text message in the past year.
  • Faculty was more likely than management and older faculty more likely than younger faculty to view the law library as productive and efficient.
  • Nearly 80% of survey respondents felt that the speed of response from librarians to faculty requests was excellent."
Earlier Library Boy posts about Primary Research Group Reports include:

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 3:16 pm 0 comments

Supreme Court of Canada: New Library Titles

The list of new library titles added to the Supreme Court of Canada collection from October 16-31, 2019 is now available on the Court website.

It is possible to subscribe via e-mail to receive the list.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 2:59 pm 0 comments

Thursday, October 31, 2019

Materials Available from Webinar on Being an Intervener in a Court Case

On October 11, 2019, the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) and the Canadian Federation of Library Associations hosted a webinar on Being an Intervener in a Court Case.

The materials from that event are now available online (Powerpoint and recording).

CALL had intervener status in front of the Supreme Court of Canada in the Keatley Surveying Ltd. v. Teranet Inc. case on Crown copyright. The case was heard in March 2019.

Interveners offer the courts an independent specialist perspective on important issues raised in an appeal.







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posted by Michel-Adrien at 9:18 pm 0 comments

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Manitoba Law Reform Commission Consultation on Abandoned Accounts and Missing Money: Establishing a Process for Unclaimed Intangible Personal Property

The Manitoba Law Reform Commission has published a consultation report entitled Abandoned Accounts and Missing Money: Establishing a Process for Unclaimed Intangible Personal Property.

It looks at what happens to unclaimed personal property in Manitoba, such as abandoned or forgotten credit balances, insurance policies, bonds or pension plans:
"In Manitoba there is no obligation on the part of many property holders, such as credit unions and insurance policy holders, to report unclaimed personal property to the provincial government. Even where unclaimed personal property is remitted to the government the legislation provides no guidance for an individual to find out if they are the rightful owner. Other Canadian jurisdictions have enacted legislation to address unclaimed property so that money can end up in the hands of rightful owners. In light of reforms in other Canadian jurisdictions, the Commission asks the question: Should Manitoba adopt a process for unclaimed intangible personal property? If so, what elements would the legislation need to address?"

"This project involves two distinct, yet related, issues: escheats and unclaimed property. While distinct legal concepts, in both cases the property vests in the Crown by operation of law. In Manitoba, both these situations are addressed in the same piece of legislation, The Escheats Act. The Commission has learned that the process for administering escheats and unclaimed property is cumbersome for the government and impractical for individuals seeking to claim vacant or unclaimed property. Other jurisdictions, such as British Columbia, Alberta, Quebec, and Ontario, have introduced changes to modernize and improve legislation related to property that vests in the Crown."

"This Consultation Report invites readers to provide their comments on ten issues for discussion. The issues identified in this report require input from interested organizations and individuals so that the Commission can craft recommendations that will be practical and meaningful to those affected by any contemplated changes to the legislation.
Chapter 2 provides background on the legal origins of escheats and vacant property and describes the current law and procedure in Manitoba. Chapter 3 explores recent legislative reforms in other jurisdictions. Chapter 4 discusses possible areas of reform to Manitoba’s legal framework for escheats and unclaimed property, touching on important considerations should the  government wish to introduce a regime for unclaimed property."

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 8:34 pm 0 comments

Monday, October 28, 2019

New UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning Book on Prison Libraries

The UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning has published the first UNESCO publication on prison libraries, highlighting their contribution to the personal development and education of incarcerated adults and young people:
"This publication explores the extent to which prison authorities fulfil their societal mandate to rehabilitate and reintegrate inmates by enabling them to use prison libraries to pursue their right to education."

"Reading and using a prison library can open up a world beyond prison bars, allowing prisoners to forget for a time the harsh reality of prison life and empower them to choose their own reading materials in an otherwise extremely restrictive and regulated environment. Providing access to relevant books and information in various languages, including easy reading materials, is crucial for prisoners’ personal development."

"This publication takes a closer look at selected examples of prison library systems around the world, outlining best practice and possible challenges, thus demonstrating their transformative potential as informational, educational, cultural and recreational meeting and learning spaces."
The open access e-book was launched at the most recent conference in August of the  International Federation of Library Associations in Athens.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 8:12 pm 0 comments

Sunday, October 27, 2019

One-Day Legal Research and Writing Workshop in Toronto

On December 6, 2019, Osgoode Hall Law School and the University of Toronto Faculty of Law will jointly host a One-Day Legal Writing Institute Workshop entitled Research and Writing in the Experiential Learning Context.

The event takes place at Osgoode Hall and includes the following workshops:

  • Supporting the Development of Rigorous Legal Writing Skills Using a Clinician’s Toolkit
  • Problem-based Law Clinic Workshops 
  • Minding the Gaps: Making Students Mindful of Weaknesses in their Legal Analysis and Writing 
  • Experiential Learning and Legal Technology Proficiency
  • Maximizing the Experiential Experience: How to Boost Research Skills Instruction for Long-Term Retention
  • Teaching Contracts and Commercial Contracts as an Upper Level Legal Writing Experiential Course
  • Two for the Price of One: Integrating Transactional Drafting into Traditional Legal Writing Assignments

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 4:42 pm 0 comments

Supreme Court of Canada Calendar of November 2019 Hearings

The Supreme Court of Canada has published its calendar of upcoming appeals that will be heard next month.

To find out more about any particular case, click on the docket number in parentheses next to each case name to find docket information, case summaries as well as facta from the parties.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 4:37 pm 0 comments