Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Calgary Statement on Free Access to Legal Information

The Council of Canadian Academic Law Library Directors has released the Calgary Statement on Free Access to Legal Information adopted in mid-May.

The Statement promotes the principles of open access in scholarly publishing at Canadian academic institutions and of free access to legal information in society.

It comes 2 and 1/2 years after the Durham Statement on Open Access to Legal Scholarship adopted by the law libraries of major American universities.

Earlier Library Boy posts on open access scholarly publishing include:
  • Law Library Directors: Law Reviews Should Stop Print, Go Fully Digital (February 24, 2009): "Today, the Law Library Blog reprints the Durham Statement on Open Access to Legal Scholarship, written by the directors of some of the major academic law libraries in the United States. In the document, they call for the abandonment of print versions of law journals and the adoption of 'stable, open, digital formats' for the dissemination of legal scholarship. They also call on law libraries to stop acquiring print versions of law journals ..."
  • Live Webcast Friday of Duke Conference on Open Access Law Journals (October 20, 2010): "Duke University in North Carolina is hosting a workshop this Friday, October 22 on Implementing the Durham Statement: Best Practices for Open Access Law Journals ..."
  • Newest Issue of Law Library Journal (February 14, 2011): "The most recent issue of Law Library Journal is available on the website of the American Association of Law Libraries. Among the highlights: The Durham Statement Two Years Later: Access in the Law School Journal Environment: 'The Durham Statement on Open Access to Legal Scholarship, drafted by a group of academic law library directors, was promulgated in February 2009. It calls for two things: (1) open access publication of law school–published journals; and (2) an end to print publication of law journals, coupled with a commitment to keeping the electronic versions available in 'stable, open, digital formats.' The two years since the Statement was issued have seen increased publication of law journals in openly available electronic formats, but little movement toward all-electronic publication. This article discusses the issues raised by the Durham Statement, the current state of law journal publishing, and directions forward'."
  • Law Library Journal Spring 2011 Issue (May 24, 2011): "The Spring 2011 issue of Law Library Journal is out. It is a publication of the American Association of Law Libraries. Among the articles I found interesting are: A Response to The Durham Statement Two Years Later (Margaret A. Leary): 'This response to The Durham Statement Two Years Later, published in the Winter 2011 issue of Law Library Journal, addresses that article’s call for an end to print publication of law journals and its failure to sufficiently consider the national and international actors and developments that will determine the future of digital libraries'."

Labels: , , , ,

Bookmark and Share Subscribe
posted by Michel-Adrien at 9:59 pm

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home