Friday, September 29, 2017

Annotated Criminal Code for Social Media Abuse

University of British Columbia law professor Benjamin Perrin has published an annotated Criminal Code that deals with Social Media Crime in Canada:


"This annotated Criminal Code aims to be a resource for scholars, judges, Crown prosecutors and defence counsel, police, and others interested in social media and criminal law. After the relevant Criminal Code provisions in bold, a brief description of the general law related to them appear, followed by a more detailed set of case summaries that describe the application of each provision in the social media context. These summaries are concise enough to identify potentially relevant judicial decisions quickly so that readers can then consult the full decisions. The following offences are covered in this annotated Criminal Code:
  • Participation in the activity in a terrorist group (s. 83.18)
  • Counselling the commission of an indictable offence for the benefit of, at the direction of or in association with a terrorist organization (ss. 2, 83.24-27, 464)
  • Public mischief (s. 140)
  • Sexual interference (s. 151)
  • Invitation to sexual touching (s. 152)
  • Sexual Exploitation (s. 153)
  • Voyeurism (s. 162)
  • Child pornography (s. 163.1)
  • Luring a child (s. 172.1)
  • Indecent acts (s. 173)
  • Criminal harassment (s. 264)
  • Uttering threats (s. 264.1)
  • Sexual assault (s. 265)
  • Inciting hatred (s. 319)
  • Unauthorized use of a computer (s. 342.1)
  • Extortion (s. 346) "
The CBC interviewd Prof. Perrin yestersay.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 3:44 pm 0 comments links to this post

Supreme Court of Canada: New Library Titles

The list of new library titles added to the Supreme Court of Canada collection from September 16th to 30th, 2017 is now available on the Court website.


It is possible to subscribe via e-mail to receive the list.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 3:33 pm 0 comments links to this post

Thursday, September 28, 2017

US Federal Courts Web Archive

The Library of Congress blog In Custodia Legis has a post today on the launching of the Federal Courts Web Archive:
"The Federal Courts Web Archive, recently launched by the Library of Congress Web Archiving Team and the Law Library of Congress, provides retrospective archival coverage of the websites of the federal judiciary. The websites in this archive include those of the Supreme Court of the United States, as well as federal appellate courts, trial courts, and other tribunals. These sites contain a wide variety of resources prepared by federal courts, such as: slip opinions, transcripts, dockets, court rules, calendars, announcements, judicial biographies, statistics, educational resources, and reference materials. The materials available on the federal court websites were created to support a diverse array of users and needs, including attorneys and their clients, pro se litigants seeking to represent themselves, jurors, visitors to the court, and community outreach programs."
The archive covers the following courts:
  • US Supreme Court
  • U.S. Courts of Appeals
  • U.S. District Courts
  • U.S. Court of International Trade
  • U.S. Bankruptcy Courts
  • U.S. Court of Federal Claims
  • U.S. Tax Court
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 12:43 pm 0 comments links to this post

Preview of the Upcoming Term of the US Supreme Court

The Congressional Research Service in Washington has prepared a Preview of Select Cases for the upcoming term of the US Supreme Court:
"The next Court term has the potential to be one of the most consequential in years."
"A full discussion of every case that the Court will hear during the October 2017 term is beyond the scope of this report (indeed, the Court has to grant certiorari to the majority of cases that will likely make up its docket for the upcoming year). But Table 1 provides brief summaries of the cases the Court has already agreed to hear during the October 2017 term, and many of the cases on the Court’s docket are discussed in existing or forthcoming CRS products. The majority of this report highlights four notable cases of the new term that could impact the work of Congress: (1) Carpenter v. United States; (2) Christie v. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA); (3) Gill v. Whitford; and (4) Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission."
The highlighted cases deal with:
  • the warrantless collection of historical cell phone location data
  • New Jersey’s sports gambling prohibition
  • electoral redistricting and gerrymandering
  • states’ interests in enforcing their civil rights laws against the interests of those who object to same-sex marriage on religious grounds

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 12:38 pm 0 comments links to this post

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Law Library of Congress Interview With Michael Goodson, Baseball Law Expert

In Custodia Legis, the blog of the Law Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., has posted an interview this week with Michael Goodson, Collection Services Intern whose job is to identify U.S. and foreign legal collection items related to baseball and the law for a major library exhibit next year:
"How would you describe your job to other people?
I would describe my job to other people as becoming the dedicated baseball expert of the Law Library of Congress – specializing in searching the vast legal collections for fascinating information in order to help put together the upcoming Baseball Americana exhibit (...)

What is the most interesting fact you’ve learned about the Law Library?
The Library of Congress has the most extensive baseball card as well as comics collections!"
The Law Library of Congress is the world’s largest law library, with a collection of over 2.65 million volumes from all ages of history and virtually every jurisdiction in the world.   

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 8:03 pm 0 comments links to this post

Five Questions with Megan Siu, Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) has been running a series of member profiles called Five Questions With...

The most recent interview is with Megan Siu, Community Development & Education Specialist, Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta.
Many more profiles can be found on the CALL Blog.

Another interesting profile series consists of interviews by the Law Library of Congress in Washington with members of its staff.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:58 pm 0 comments links to this post

Monday, September 25, 2017

Supreme Court of Canada Calendar of Upcoming October 2017 Hearings

The Supreme Court of Canada has published its calendar of appeal hearings for October 2017.

To find out more about any particular case, click on the docket number in parentheses next to each case name to find docket information, case summaries as well as facta from the parties.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 12:40 pm 0 comments links to this post

Sunday, September 24, 2017

Law Commission of Ontario Releases Fifth Paper on Defamation

This is a follow-up to the July 27, 2017 Library Boy post entitled Law Commission of Ontario Releases Papers on Defamation.

The Law Commission of Ontario has released a fifth and final background paper as part of its project on Defamation Law in the Internet Age.

The paper is entitled Reputation systems, ADR, Industry Regulation and other Extra-Judicial Possibilities for Protecting Reputation in the Internet Age.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:38 pm 0 comments links to this post

Updated Research Guides From GlobaLex

GlobaLex, the electronic collection created by the Hauser Global Law School Program at the New York University School of Law, recently updated some of its research guides:
  • A Research Guide to Cases and Materials on Terrorism: "A bibliographic survey of the law relating to terrorism - even one that tries to avoid advocacy and argument, and perhaps even more so on account of that - exposes its author to criticism more than anything over definition and criteria for inclusion. Terrorism itself is a moving target: laws addressing it written by a fearful Establishment, its history written by the victors. Terrorist acts can be undertaken for all sorts of reasons or, conceptually at least, for none at all other than to promote anarchy or to express hatred. A purely criminal undertaking (as in extortion) is the least likely to threaten the wider public (such crime tends to be local or limited to particular ethnic groups) and it is also the easiest to deal with. Terrorist acts commonly arise out of grievance and frustration, real or imagined: religious, political, economic, personal. Terrorism, or the threat of terrorism, can involve weapons of mass destruction, or it can consist of measures of murder and mayhem, repression and intimidation directed at individuals, at a group or class, or at all the inhabitants of a region or state. While a dozen or more sectors of the law are pertinent to terrorism - some as cause, some as effect, some as impediment and some as punishment - historically, no law has been more successful than the mere passage of time in bringing it to an end. Terrorism and its companion, civil unrest, either bring revolutionary change and are then sanctified in a new national myth, or they fail and grievances either continue to fester or are overtaken by events (...) The point of this survey is not so much to list sources - many of these could be found with a search engine and legal database; others by using some of the better bibliographic sites listed here. It is rather to provide some assistance in planning research and in formulating issues to address - to examine the range of issues and provide links, first to sources that are considered reliable and unbiased, then to specimen law cases and scholarly articles and, finally, to opinions and arguments not otherwise adumbrated which, even if they are in support of a particular agenda are coherent, plausible and forthright in their advocacy or apologia. Collected here are many of the major court cases involving terrorism and terrorists of the modern era, as well as a sampling of issues related to terrorism. "
  • The Amparo Context in Latin American Jurisdiction: An Approach to an Empowering Action: " Since 1948 and after the American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the necessity of a judicial mechanism of human rights protection became a global concern. Under the influence of Mexican amparo, the right to everyone 'to simple and prompt recourse, or any other effective recourse, to a competent court or tribunal for protection against acts that violate his fundamental rights recognized by the constitution or laws of the state concerned or by this Convention, even though such violation may have been committed by persons acting in the course of their official duties' was included in the American Convention on Human Rights (article 25.1) in 1969. With this 'inter-American purpose', the writ of amparo was conceived (also called Acción de Tutela, Recurso de Amparo and Juicio de Amparo, among others), inspired in the Mexican amparo which was created with the deep conviction of the need for a procedural instrument to protect the fundamental rights of the governed against the public power, including challenging the constitutionality of laws. Today is clear that one fundamental aspect in the modernization of the justice system in Latin American countries has been the quantitative and qualitative improvement of the instruments and the constitutional possibilities for the citizen to access the justice. This is particularly relevant taking into account the lack of access and the corruption in some governments and justice systems in the region. "

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:30 pm 0 comments links to this post

Government Information Day in Ottawa

The University of Ottawa Library and the Carleton University Library, in collaboration with Library and Archives Canada (LAC), are holding a Government Information Day on October 26, 2017.

The day's activities will take place at Library and Archives Canada and feature presentations on the following themes:
  • Access to government information and data in an era of “open by default” 
  • Extending preservation and access - government information and data beyond government 
The full program is available on the LAC website.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:24 pm 0 comments links to this post

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Newest Issue of Canadian Law Library Review

The most recent issue of the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR) is available online.

The CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:35 pm 0 comments links to this post

Monday, September 18, 2017

The Good and Bad of PowerPoint Slides

Ah...PowerPoint.

How do I love thee? How do I hate thee? Let me count the ways...

Today on Slaw.ca, Steven B. Levy wrote about what PowerPoint is good for, and not so good for:
"I’ve seen many successful projects perceived as troubled simply because the project manager couldn’t 'manage' a presentation."

"In a project management presentation, PowerPoint (or its equivalent) is good for two things, and two things only:
  • Visuals, and
  • Signposts
It is a very poor tool for the purpose most people use it: transmission of information."
Not that I have ever, ever made any of the mistakes listed.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:25 pm 0 comments links to this post

Saturday, September 16, 2017

Supreme Court of Canada: New Library Titles

The list of new library titles added to the Supreme Court of Canada collection from September 1st to 15th, 2017 is now available on the Court website.

It is possible to subscribe via e-mail to receive the list.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 3:34 pm 0 comments links to this post

Thursday, September 14, 2017

September 2017 Issue of Governance and Recordkeeping Around the World

The Governance and Recordkeeping Around the World newsletter, published by Library and Archives Canada (LAC), highlights issues pertaining to government and recordkeeping practices in the public and private sectors around the world.

The September 2017 issue has just been published.

It includes:
  • news items from Canada and around the world 
  • announcements of upcoming Canadian and international events (meetings, conferences, seminars) 
  • project and product news in areas such as digitization, archives, open source, e-government, access to information and Web 2.0 
  • listings of papers and readings (white papers, presentations, reports)

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 5:28 pm 0 comments links to this post

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Law Library of Congress Interview With Adrienne Keys, Specialist in Legislative Information Systems Management

In Custodia Legis, the blog of the Law Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., has posted an interview this week with Adrienne Keys, specialist in legislative information systems management within the Congressional Research Service (CRS) of the Library of Congress:
"How would you describe your job to other people?
As a specialist in legislative information systems management, I do a little bit of a lot of different things for Congress.gov, including testing the system to ensure the accuracy of legislative and congressional data, and making sure that new and existing site features are working correctly. I am currently preparing to give a demonstration of the site to a group of congressional staff as part of a pre-conference event. I am also frequently on the front line answering questions about the site from users – which reminds me very much of my previous jobs in public affairs and congressional services. One aspect of my role that I particularly enjoy is publishing tips on Congress.gov search – and other site – functions. New tips are posted on Congress.gov’s homepage almost every week, with links to help pages with detailed information and images that provide additional guidance."
Congress.gov is the free official website for U.S. federal legislative information.

The Law Library of Congress is the world’s largest law library, with a collection of over 2.65 million volumes from all ages of history and virtually every jurisdiction in the world.  

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 5:35 pm 0 comments links to this post

American Libraries Magazine 2017 Library Design Showcase

The magazine American Libraries has just published the 2017 Library Design Showcase:
"These are shining examples of innovative architectural feats that address user needs in unique, interesting, and effective ways. Renovations and expansions dominated this year, showing that libraries are holding on to and breathing new life into spaces already cherished by their communities."
One of the buildings featured in the slide show is the Vaughan Civic Centre Resource Library in Vaughan, Ontario.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 5:28 pm 0 comments links to this post

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) on Indigenous Canada

The University of Alberta has developed a free MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) entitled Indigenous Canada:
"From an Indigenous perspective, this course explores key issues facing Indigenous peoples today from a historical and critical perspective highlighting national and local Indigenous-settler relations."
"Indigenous Canada is for students from faculties outside the Faculty of Native Studies with an interest in acquiring a basic familiarity with Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal relationships."
The free online class takes place over 12 weeks and includes twelve modules composed of video lectures, course notes and required and recommended readings.

Topics covered include:
  • The fur trade and other exchange relationships
  • Land claims and environmental impacts
  • Legal systems and rights
  • Political conflicts and alliances
  • Indigenous political activism
  • Contemporary Indigenous life, art and its expressions.
Earlier Library Boy posts about MOOCs include:

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:48 pm 0 comments links to this post

Monday, September 11, 2017

Manitoba Law Reform Consultation Report on Small Estates

The Manitoba Law Reform Commission has published a Consultation Report on Updating the Administration of Small Estates as part of its Access to Justice initiative entitled "Access to Courts and Court Processes".

"In Manitoba, The Court of Queen’s Bench Surrogate Practice Act ('The Surrogate Practice Act') governs the administration of estates, whether there is a will or not. The rules in place serve to protect estates from fraud and mismanagement. The ordinary process for obtaining probate carries with it legal and administrative costs as well as time and administrative burdens. But what happens in the case of relatively small estates, where the costs associated with administering the estate may be disproportionately high compared to the value of the estate? In these cases, the estate available for distribution may be depleted. Alternatively, the personal representative for the estate may choose not to administer the estate at all"

(...)

"This Consultation Report considers possible amendments to improve the legislation and procedure related to the summary administration of small estates under The Surrogate Practice Act. The primary area addressed is whether the monetary jurisdiction should be increased."
The report looks at practices in a number of other Canadian jurisdictions, including Ontario, Saskatchewan, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories.

The comment period on this Consultation Report is open until October 30, 2017.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 5:20 pm 0 comments links to this post

13 Questions With Allyson Fox - Southern Ontario Library Service

The librarianship.ca website has been running a series of librarian profiles called 13 Questions With ...

Here is the most recent one with Allyson Fox, Training Manager, Southern Ontario Library Service:
"Why a career in librarianship?
Working at the Law Society of Upper Canada was what led to me pursing a career as a librarian. I didn’t intentionally seek out a library job, but once I started working in the Great Library, I knew that I was where I was supposed to be. I loved spending my days in the library and watching and listening to the knowledgeable staff members, many of whom had been there for decades. They seemed to know everything there was to know about legal research. I liked the high-pressure environment as lawyers would rush in on very tight deadlines and the reference team would work together to get them the information they needed. My manager (Jeanette Bosschart) and the Executive Director (Janine Miller) encouraged me to apply to FIS [University of Toronto]. I pursued my Masters degree while continuing to work part time. Their support and belief in me is what allowed me to finish my Masters while continuing to work and gain the hands on front line experience that I have since applied to every role I’ve had (...)

How do you stay current in your field?
In my current role as Training Manager at SOLS, I develop and coordinate training opportunities for public library staff across southern Ontario. To do my job well, I need to keep on top of the evolving trends and issues impacting public libraries. One of the things I love most about my job is that I get to connect with people working in libraries of all sizes which allows me to stay current about the innovative and exciting things public libraries are doing to serve their communities."

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 5:07 pm 0 comments links to this post

Most Recent Issue of LawNow: Wills and Estates

The most recent issue of LawNow is available online.









The magazine is published by the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta.

The main section contains a number of features articles on wills and estates.

The issue also has a special report on the Canadian Senate.

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Sunday, September 10, 2017

Québec Copyright Collective Sues Laval University

This is a follow-up to the July 23, 2017 Library Boy post entitled Reaction to Federal Court Decision on York University Fair Dealing that discussed the lawsuit by Access Copyright over the alleged improper reproduction and copying of protected works at York University in Toronto.

Last week, Québec copyright collective Copibec announced it was launching a class action lawsuit against Québec City-based Université Laval for alleged copyright infringement.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 3:06 pm 0 comments links to this post

Thursday, September 07, 2017

Everyday Legal Problems and the Cost of Justice

The Canadian Forum on Civil Justice (CFCJ) surveyed over 3,000 people in Canada to better understand their experiences with the civil and family justice system.

The CFCJ has broken down the results based on:

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 3:27 pm 0 comments links to this post

Wednesday, September 06, 2017

University Of Ottawa Will Host Revived Court Challenges Program

According to the CBC, the University of Ottawa will host a revived Court Challenges Program to help Canadians launch constitutional rights cases in court.

The Program, which provided funding to help minority, women's and other disadvantaged groups to help them launch "test court cases" challenging laws that may violate equality rights under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, was dismantled under the previous federal government.

According to the CBC story:
"The university will create a new Canadian Centre for the Court Challenges Program, which will be independent of the school aside from administrative support."

"Its role will be to assist the two expert panels who decide which cases to fund: one devoted to official-language cases and the other to human rights (...)"

"[Professor Richard] Clément said the centre will soon hire a small staff, including two lawyers to receive and analyze requests. The lawyers will present each case to the relevant expert panel, who will decide independently whether to provide funding."
The government has committed to spend $5 million per year on the program.

Earlier Library Boy posts about the Court Challenges Program include (older links may not work):
  • Court Challenges Program Challenged? (September 7, 2006): "Newspapers of the CanWest Global chain distributed a Janice Tibbetts article today that claims that the federal government may be considering the elimination of the Court Challenges Program as part of an overall review of government programs (...) The CanWest News Service article entitled Funding for minority groups to challenge federal laws under review reports that the program, first set up under former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, 'has been the target of harsh criticism from social conservatives and critics of so-called judicial activism, who assert the initiative is a slush-fund for left-leaning groups to circumvent the will of elected legislators by challenging them in court'."
  • Lawsuit to Reinstate Federal Court Challenges Program (January 8, 2008): "According to [the Osgoode Hall Law School blog] The Court, 'Last month, a coalition of eight organizations representing equality-seeking communities announced that it will file a motion in Federal Court to intervene in a case challenging the decision of the federal government to cut funding to the Court Challenges Program (...) While operating, the program funded cases dealing with issues such as same-sex marriage, accessibility rights for people with disabilities, sex discrimination, violence against women, criminal law provisions regarding the use of disciplinary force against children, and racial discrimination in the immigration system'. "
  • Impact on Language Minorities from Court Challenges Program Cancellation (January 22, 2008): "The most recent issue of the Canadian government's Weekly Checklist of official publications lists the December 2007 report of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages on the Court Challenges Program." 
  • Partial Restoration of Court Challenges Program (June 20, 2008): "The government is only reestablishing the official languages minority component of the program, under the name Program to Support Linguistic Rights. However, funding has not been restored for Charter challenges by other groups such as ethnic minorities, gays and lesbians or people with disabilities."

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 5:59 pm 0 comments links to this post

Tuesday, September 05, 2017

September 2017 Issue of In Session - E-Newsletter of Canadian Association of Law Libraries

The September 2017 issue of In Session is available online.

It is the monthly e-newsletter of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) and contains news from CALL committees and special interest groups, member updates and events.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 3:12 pm 0 comments links to this post

Monday, September 04, 2017

University Of Toronto Symposium on Library Metrics

The iSchool at the University of Toronto is organizing a symposium next month (Oct. 2 & 3) on Outcomes, Value & Impact: Metrics for Library Success:
"Are your measurement strategies up-to-date?
  • Are you up-to-date on the latest in statistical profiles of libraries in Canada?
  • Are we measuring the community engagement and learning or just counting transactional stats?
  • What's the next step in measurement and what do we know about peer analyses now?"
Speakers include: 
  • Rebecca Jones, Director, Services, Brampton Public Library
  • Mohamed Hosseini-Ara, Toronto Public Library
  • Kim Silk, Canadian Research Network & Author, Creating a Culture of Evaluation
  • Richard Hulser, Chief Librarian, Natural History Museum of LA
  • Terry Beck, Information Services Manager, Sno-Isle Libraries
  • Christa Werle, Public Services Project Manager, Sno-Isle Libraries (via Skype)
  • Lindsay Hanson, Data Analysis Librarian, Sno-Isle Libraries
  • Stephen Abram, Executive Director,Federation of Ontario Public Libraries
  • Carl Thompson, Counting Opinions
  • Daphne Wood, Director, Communications & Development, Greater Victoria Public Library

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:13 pm 0 comments links to this post